Down the Hatch Swallowing Podcast

1.65 ASHA CEUs | Taught by: Ianessa Humbert and Alicia Vose

Course description

Down the Hatch (DtH) Swallowing Podcast is now available for 1.65 ASHA CEUs.  Listen to DtH episodes 1 through 17 either on STEP, SoundCloud, iTunes or any other podcast hosting platform and complete the learning assessment listed in this module to earn ASHA CEUs. You can email stepcommunityteam@gmail.com to obtain your certificates. CEU information will be submitted to ASHA on a quarterly basis by the STEP team. 

Please Note: The Down the Hatch CEU Bundle costs $100 (one-time payment) for 1.65 ASHA CEUs. It is different from STEP Membership, which costs $9/month for unlimited access to all the other content on this website. 

About DtH: Down the Hatch is the first swallowing podcast focused on hot topics relevant to swallowing clinicians throughout the world. With lively banter, speech pathologists Ianessa Humbert, Ph.D., CCC-SLP and Alicia Vose, M.A., CCC-SLP take on controversial topics in the field of dysphagia management, while inter-weaving various levels of evidence: anecdotes, clinical experience and the scientific literature. Listeners can expect to broaden their view of what is thought to be fact versus fiction in the field of swallowing and swallowing disorders.

Educational Level: Intermediate - Information is geared to practitioners with a general working knowledge of current practice trends and literature related subject matter. Focus is on increasing understanding and competent application of subject matter. 

Learning Objectives: As a result of this course participants will be able to: 

  • Identify the major challenges for advocacy in dysphagia management 
  • Differentiate between evidence-based and theory-based practice in dysphagia management
  • List 3 major challenges of formal and informal dysphagia education
  • Learn to create and use  physiologically-guided therapy plans to incorporate into clear medical documentation
  • Describe 2 principles of electrical stimulation and expiratory muscle strength training for dysphagia management
  • Identify 3 key similarities and differences between normal and abnormal swallowing
  • List 3 commonly over-interpreted findings from the Clinical Swallowing Evaluation

Taught By

Ianessa Humbert  and Alicia Vose
Ianessa Humbert and Alicia Vose

Dr. Ianessa Humbert is an Associate Professor at the University of Florida in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. She has expertise in swallowing and swallowing disorders. Dr. Humbert’s research program is focused on the physiological mechanisms of swallowing disorders and the development of rehabilitation strategies for dysfunction. Dr. Humbert’s research has been steadily supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, The American Heart Association, and The American Speech Language Hearing Association since 2006. Dr. Humbert is a widely sought after invited speaker at several regional, national, and international clinical and scientific meetings. She has created online courses for CEU credit on swallowing physiology and clinical practice, and is the author of the Swallowing Pocket Guide: A Quick Reference for Muscles and Innervation, which has sold several hundred copies nationally and internationally.

Alicia Vose is a current PhD student at the University of Florida under Dr. Ianessa Humbert. She completed her Bachelors degree in Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology at the University of Connecticut and her Masters Degree in Speech-Language Pathology from the George Washington University. She obtained her CCC-SLP at The Johns Hopkins Hospital where she spent the past 6 years practicing in acute inpatient care. Alicia has clinical specialties in diagnosis and management of swallowing disorders following acute surgery, trauma and solid organ transplantation. She also specializes in the effects of critical care medicine on swallowing, and swallowing and communication options for patients in the Intensive Care Unit, including tracheostomy and ventilator dependent patients. Alicia is currently at the University of Florida working on her PhD in Rehabilitation Science focusing on neurophysiology and dysphagia. Current interests include mechanisms underlying normal and disordered airway protection, applying physiology to clinical decision-making, and investigating the interactions between breathing and swallowing in individuals with dysphagia.